Revenue Neutral: A Liarspalooza

Revenue Neutral is not Congress cutting spending.

Revenue Neutral is not Congress capping spending..

Revenue Neutral will not Make Government Small Again.

Revenue Neutral is not about the Proper Role of Government

Revenue Neutral is not Tax Reform.

Revenue Neutral is about Control. It is about some in Congress wanting to maintain control of your hard earned money by redistributing it to their favorite projects and agendas and people. Instead of living on a budget or scrapping redundant or useless or wasteful or unconstitutional programs, ones that infringe upon unalienable rights, some in Congress want to keep spending your money without consequence, without conscience, and without just cause. 

Seriously Republicans, get a grip on it and stand for something.

You said. We believed you. We Won.

Now go and win some more. Take Back America! 

Full Repeal. No Bailouts. No Excuses. Cut, Cap, and Balance that stinkin’ budget already. Sheesh. 

 

Inspiration to Share the Good

Earlier in the month I caught Karen Vaughn on Glenn Beck’s radio program and then again that evening on his television show. It was then, even after having seen her book tweeted about by some of my favorite follows, that I was moved to purchase a copy for me and one specific friend’s birthday gift.

So I went to her website to order them. Once on the purchase link I noticed the 10 Book Bundle as a great deal but I only needed two. Then a still, small voice whispered get the ten book deal. 

Much to my surprise, I thought, Who would I give them too? 

Oh you will figure that out when they get here, came the quiet reply.

Going with the flow of my thoughts and feelings and a click of the mouse, the book bundle was  ordered.  

When the box arrived I was excited but wondering to whom these books would go. As I began taking each book out of the box, one by one a name popped into my mind.

Now I have but two books to deliver plus one I need to send to my sister by post. The gifting is complete. 

Even at my age, I can be a World Changer. I can help #TakeBackTheCulture by simply seeing the good then sharing the good with others.   

#SeeTheGood #ShareTheGood #TakeBackTheCulture #WorldChanger

202/365

 

 

Musical Eclipse Songs

While getting my hair done today, Teles, the receptionist and assistant extraordinaire at Root Salon, got talking about eclipse songs. He started singing Bonnie Tyler’s Total Eclipse of the Heart and of course, it got into everyone’s head as we tried to remember the words. 

One of the first songs that popped into my mind was Spaceman by Harry Nillson. Nothing about eclipse in the song but it is about space. It makes me wonder what the total eclipse would look like from that perspective. 

201/365

 

 

 

It was a rat

Honey-do noticed our Black Lab going nuts around the storage room door so he brought her inside in case there was a rat or a lizard in there. She is really fast and she catches them. 

Evidently a rat chewed a hole in the bag of Ramik mini-bars that our landlady left in there, on a high shelf. 

Glad Honey-do found the body first. I would totally be creeped out by the scenario. 

Now, all things are right in the universe and the Lab is settled in for the evening. 

200/365

 

 

Rex E. Lee: BYU Speech, January 15, 1991

When I get irritated with politics and politicians and all of the yammering by talking heads that make my head want to explode, I go back to some of the great sermons and speeches that matter most to me, like this one by Rex E. Lee.

You can listen to it here.  You can read it here.

I highly recommend that you listen and read along because Rex Lee speaks from his heart, throwing in a few wonderful asides from his written script.  

QUOTE: 

The Constitution is, in short, a limitation on government. It accomplishes its governmental-authority-confining mission in two basic ways, and, with the exception of the Thirteenth Amendment, every provision of the Constitution, in my opinion, falls into either one or the other of these two categories of limitations on governmental power.

The first category is the obvious one. The Constitution contains some fairly obvious, though not always specific, prohibitions concerning what government—federal, state, or local—can do to its citizens. Some of the most prominent are protections for the criminally accused, such as the privilege against self-incrimination, protection against unreasonable searches and seizures, the right to counsel, and jury trial. The best known of the noncriminal protections are contained in the First Amendment, most of whose guarantees pertain to some form of free expression, and include freedom of speech and press, freedom of assembly, and the free exercise of religion. (Interestingly enough, the only nonexpression right contained in the First Amendment is a structural provision, the so-called establishment clause, which deals with relationships between governments and religious organizations.) And although the original Constitution was criticized by the anti-Federalists for its lack of a bill of rights, it actually contained several important limitations on government designed solely to protect individual rights, such as the prohibitions against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws, the habeas corpus guarantee, and the contracts clause.

The other way that the Constitution limits governmental powers is more subtle, not as well known, but equally important and equally effective. It consists of a combination of two separate structural provisions. They are structural provisions in that they protect the individual against governmental power not by overtly prescribing what government cannot do, but rather by creating separate governmental units that compete for government power. By spreading the powers of government among several separate entities and by making each a competitor with the others, there is a lesser likelihood that any of those entities can ever acquire power in sufficient measure to become oppressive. The Constitution accomplishes this division of power along two dimensions: one horizontal, and one vertical.

 

Additional reading:  In the Ecosystem of Rights, Religious Freedom Is Foundational

197/365

Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancakes

No. They are not gluten free. Yes. It is against the Paleo-Eat-Clean theory. 

It matters not to me. I ground the wheat myself, then poured in the grade A, whole buttermilk to make the lightest, fluffiest pancakes yesterday. Yes I did.

And I ate one. And yes, yes it was delicious. In fact it was so tasty that I had one for breakfast today. Those pancakes made my face and my tummy smile, yes indeed, as did the pure maple syrup. 

Betty Crocker’s recipe is the one I basically followed, using coconut oil in place of the vegetable oil and I added in one extra egg.  

Um, um, Good! 

196/365