Reflected, Refocused, Renewed

One of the best things I did was take the 10 Day Social Media Fast. Here is the challenge:

First, I invite you to participate in a 10-day fast from social media and from any other media that bring negative and impure thoughts to your mind. Pray to know which influences to remove during your fast. The effect of your 10-day fast may surprise you. What do you notice after taking a break from perspectives of the world that have been wounding your spirit? Is there a change in where you now want to spend your time and energy? Have any of your priorities shifted—even just a little? I urge you to record and follow through with each impression. 

~ President Russell M. Nelson

What I found I truly enjoyed was really listening to Glenn Beck and The Blaze television streaming every day. Glenn is now doing the sort of programming that needed to be done several years ago, conversations. Conversations about the Founding Fathers. Conversations about The Divine Constitution, all of the things that must be discussed and repeated through the generations. Glenn has a ton of great On Demand programs but I love the live broadcasts and really enjoy the conversations with his guests.

One quote from many years ago has come to my mind over the past thirty days:

The merchant who tries to sell you a product by extolling its virtues and offering it to you at a fair price is engaged in legitimate persuasion. The merchant who exaggerates the quality of his product, fails to disclose dangerous weaknesses, or misleads as to price is manipulating.

~ M. Dallas Burnett

Stepping carefully back into the social media scene my mind is in a much better place. Some of my thoughts and feelings are less emotional and better suited to hear things from a fresh perspective therefore the prospects are seen in a much brighter light.

Am I happy with Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan. Ugh, NO!

Am I happy with the direction too many in the Republican Party are taking our nation by voting with the Democrat non-conservative policies? Ugh, NO again!

Do I have faith in the few that are working to protect the American People from being consumed by those in Congress usurping our unalienable rights? Most definitely.

And I have faith in all of you who read and re-read our Declaration of Independence and United States Constitution. You are the ones holding Congress’ feet over the flames of freedom. You are the ones teaching future generations, by example, the foundational principles for living so they can, in turn, govern themselves.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

 Preamble to the United States Constitution

By the way, PROMOTING the general welfare, welfare as in faring well, is not providing general welfare as some people claim through the redistribution of wealth as plainly illustrated in the Declaration of Independence.

Additional Reading: 
  1. Civic Standards for the Faithful Saints – Ezra Taft Benson
  2. The Constitution—A Glorious Standard – Ezra Taft Benson
  3. Our Divine Constitution – Ezra Taft Benson
  4. If They Will But Serve the God of the Land – N. Eldon Tanner
  5. The Times In Which We Live – Gordon B. Hinckley
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Religious Freedom: It must be fought for

The ability to read, ponder, and then act upon the ideas you formulate through critical thinking matter. It is important to preserving personal freedom. You never know who you may influence through your open and honest approach to seeing things as they really are. 

Why America’s religious freedom ambassador thinks everyone can help ‘fight’ for this ‘foundational’ right

Remember when…..? 

Shapiro: Supreme Court: Be polite when you violate others’ rights

Religious Freedom

Learn about religious freedom and what you can do to protect it. 

Some of this content is specific to the United States, but the principles can be adapted in other countries. (click here

Forged and Tempered: Men of Consequence

The rise of a third party will probably increase the power to the Progressive Party for a long run. I agree with the premise we should vote for honest, upright candidates not for a party and we should point out the who’s who voting for the Progressive Party Platform. 

Mick Mulvaney gave a great interview on Fox News, as far as questions were asked but apparently interest rates will spike or could if they do not keep the economy going.

So my question is: For the next two years do we really believe, with this betrayal by bundled bills, Congressional Leaders will take back excessive spending practices by the power of the purse when they pull these kind of stunts with excessive spending and bailouts?

The meager tax reform bill that was passed, the one the House GOP and Leaders keep patting themselves on their backs about, is a total joke with the passing of the current excessive spending in this two year bill. 

“Future legislation should scrub the tax code of all subsidies for privileged interests and permanently extend a majority of the tax cuts contained in the act.” ~ The Senate’s Ugly Budget Deal Would Trample on the Success of Tax Reform

Bottom line: Mike Lee plainly and succinctly explains it here:

Thank you Thomas Massie and Mike Lee for being men of consequence.

Additional Reading: 

  1. It’s time for the Forgotten Man Caucus: Our freedom is not to be bartered away.
  2. What happened to ‘combat standards won’t be lowered’?
  3. LAUDABLE PURSUIT by Senator Mike Lee

 

Rex E. Lee: BYU Speech, January 15, 1991

When I get irritated with politics and politicians and all of the yammering by talking heads that make my head want to explode, I go back to some of the great sermons and speeches that matter most to me, like this one by Rex E. Lee.

You can listen to it here.  You can read it here.

I highly recommend that you listen and read along because Rex Lee speaks from his heart, throwing in a few wonderful asides from his written script.  

QUOTE: 

The Constitution is, in short, a limitation on government. It accomplishes its governmental-authority-confining mission in two basic ways, and, with the exception of the Thirteenth Amendment, every provision of the Constitution, in my opinion, falls into either one or the other of these two categories of limitations on governmental power.

The first category is the obvious one. The Constitution contains some fairly obvious, though not always specific, prohibitions concerning what government—federal, state, or local—can do to its citizens. Some of the most prominent are protections for the criminally accused, such as the privilege against self-incrimination, protection against unreasonable searches and seizures, the right to counsel, and jury trial. The best known of the noncriminal protections are contained in the First Amendment, most of whose guarantees pertain to some form of free expression, and include freedom of speech and press, freedom of assembly, and the free exercise of religion. (Interestingly enough, the only nonexpression right contained in the First Amendment is a structural provision, the so-called establishment clause, which deals with relationships between governments and religious organizations.) And although the original Constitution was criticized by the anti-Federalists for its lack of a bill of rights, it actually contained several important limitations on government designed solely to protect individual rights, such as the prohibitions against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws, the habeas corpus guarantee, and the contracts clause.

The other way that the Constitution limits governmental powers is more subtle, not as well known, but equally important and equally effective. It consists of a combination of two separate structural provisions. They are structural provisions in that they protect the individual against governmental power not by overtly prescribing what government cannot do, but rather by creating separate governmental units that compete for government power. By spreading the powers of government among several separate entities and by making each a competitor with the others, there is a lesser likelihood that any of those entities can ever acquire power in sufficient measure to become oppressive. The Constitution accomplishes this division of power along two dimensions: one horizontal, and one vertical.

 

Additional reading:  In the Ecosystem of Rights, Religious Freedom Is Foundational

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