Forged and Tempered: Men of Consequence

The rise of a third party will probably increase the power to the Progressive Party for a long run. I agree with the premise we should vote for honest, upright candidates not for a party and we should point out the who’s who voting for the Progressive Party Platform. 

Mick Mulvaney gave a great interview on Fox News, as far as questions were asked but apparently interest rates will spike or could if they do not keep the economy going.

So my question is: For the next two years do we really believe, with this betrayal by bundled bills, Congressional Leaders will take back excessive spending practices by the power of the purse when they pull these kind of stunts with excessive spending and bailouts?

The meager tax reform bill that was passed, the one the House GOP and Leaders keep patting themselves on their backs about, is a total joke with the passing of the current excessive spending in this two year bill. 

“Future legislation should scrub the tax code of all subsidies for privileged interests and permanently extend a majority of the tax cuts contained in the act.” ~ The Senate’s Ugly Budget Deal Would Trample on the Success of Tax Reform

Bottom line: Mike Lee plainly and succinctly explains it here:

Thank you Thomas Massie and Mike Lee for being men of consequence.

Additional Reading: 

  1. It’s time for the Forgotten Man Caucus: Our freedom is not to be bartered away.
  2. What happened to ‘combat standards won’t be lowered’?
  3. LAUDABLE PURSUIT by Senator Mike Lee

 

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Rex E. Lee: BYU Speech, January 15, 1991

When I get irritated with politics and politicians and all of the yammering by talking heads that make my head want to explode, I go back to some of the great sermons and speeches that matter most to me, like this one by Rex E. Lee.

You can listen to it here.  You can read it here.

I highly recommend that you listen and read along because Rex Lee speaks from his heart, throwing in a few wonderful asides from his written script.  

QUOTE: 

The Constitution is, in short, a limitation on government. It accomplishes its governmental-authority-confining mission in two basic ways, and, with the exception of the Thirteenth Amendment, every provision of the Constitution, in my opinion, falls into either one or the other of these two categories of limitations on governmental power.

The first category is the obvious one. The Constitution contains some fairly obvious, though not always specific, prohibitions concerning what government—federal, state, or local—can do to its citizens. Some of the most prominent are protections for the criminally accused, such as the privilege against self-incrimination, protection against unreasonable searches and seizures, the right to counsel, and jury trial. The best known of the noncriminal protections are contained in the First Amendment, most of whose guarantees pertain to some form of free expression, and include freedom of speech and press, freedom of assembly, and the free exercise of religion. (Interestingly enough, the only nonexpression right contained in the First Amendment is a structural provision, the so-called establishment clause, which deals with relationships between governments and religious organizations.) And although the original Constitution was criticized by the anti-Federalists for its lack of a bill of rights, it actually contained several important limitations on government designed solely to protect individual rights, such as the prohibitions against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws, the habeas corpus guarantee, and the contracts clause.

The other way that the Constitution limits governmental powers is more subtle, not as well known, but equally important and equally effective. It consists of a combination of two separate structural provisions. They are structural provisions in that they protect the individual against governmental power not by overtly prescribing what government cannot do, but rather by creating separate governmental units that compete for government power. By spreading the powers of government among several separate entities and by making each a competitor with the others, there is a lesser likelihood that any of those entities can ever acquire power in sufficient measure to become oppressive. The Constitution accomplishes this division of power along two dimensions: one horizontal, and one vertical.

 

Additional reading:  In the Ecosystem of Rights, Religious Freedom Is Foundational

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